Episode #90: The Hormone Domino Effect: Tracing Imbalances to Symptoms in PCOS

Episode #90: The Hormone Domino Effect: Tracing Imbalances to Symptoms in PCOS

Episode #90: The Hormone Domino Effect: Tracing Imbalances to Symptoms in PCOS

This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my disclosure and privacy policy.

The Hormone Domino Effect: Tracing Imbalances to Symptoms in PCOS

What you’ll learn in this episode

This episode dives into the intricate web of symptoms stemming from hormonal imbalances characteristic of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS). She explores how these symptoms interact with environmental factors and genetics, either exacerbating or improving the condition. You will learn about the spiral, where genetics, lifestyle, environment, and resulting symptoms form a continuous cycle. This cycle, driven by genetic predispositions and environmental factors, can either lead to the worsening or improvement of PCOS symptoms, creating a complex reality that affects individual experiences with the condition.

The Pyramid of Hormone Imbalance:

This episode illustrates the interplay between various hormones and root causes and the hierarchy of the hormone pyramid. At the top are hormones like progesterone, testosterone, and estrogen, commonly associated with PCOS, while deeper levels represent factors such as inflammation, insulin, and cortisol. These root cause hormones are the reasons for imbalances further up the pyramid and in this episode you will learn how they interact at a deeper level.

This episode highlights common pitfalls in PCOS management, such as relying on birth control or fad diets, which may mask symptoms without addressing underlying issues. By listening you will gain a better understanding of the domino effect of PCOS root causes and the significance of personalized approaches to healing. This episode provides actionable steps, including taking the PCOS root cause quiz and joining her email list for further resources and support.

Let’s Continue The Conversation

Do you have questions about this episode or other questions about PCOS? I would love to connect and chat on a more personal level over on Instagram. My DMs are my favorite place to chat more.

 

So go visit me on IG @nourishedtohealthy.com

 

Let’s Continue The Conversation

Do you have questions about this episode or other questions about PCOS? I would love to connect and chat on a more personal level over on Instagram. My DMs are my favorite place to chat more.

 

So go visit me on IG @nourishedtohealthy.com

 

rate the podcast

Spread the Awareness

If you have found this podcast helpful please take just a moment to rate it and leave a review. This helps apple, spotify or whichever platform you use know to share this podcast with other women. I truely appreciate your help supporting as many women as possible

Read The Full Episode Transcript Here

The intricate web of symptoms that stem from the hormonal imbalances that characterize Polycystic Ovarian syndrome, PCOS, are a delicate cycle that play off of each other, either worsening or improving, depending on your current environment. This domino effect of your environment, setting off your genetics, creating symptoms that affect our environment to amplify the symptoms further, is exactly what we’re going to be discussing in this episode. By tracing these connections between this cycle of symptoms and hormone imbalances, we can finally shed light on the root causes and what your body is begging for in order to repair your hormone imbalances and improve your symptoms. So if I’ve piqued your curiosity with this cycle of this and then this and then back to this and around and around, then let’s dive into this episode of the PCOS repair podcast, where we’re going to be talking about the PCOS hormone domino effect and how root cause healing can finally reverse your PCOS symptoms.

You’re listening to the PCOS Repair podcast, where we explore the ins and outs of PCOS and how to repair the imbalances in your hormones naturally with a little medical help sprinkled in. Hi, I’m Ashlene Korcek, and with many years of medical and personal experience with polycystic ovarian syndrome, it is my joy to watch women reverse their PCOS as they learn to nourish their bodies in a whole new way. With the power of our beliefs, our mindset, and our environment, and the understanding of our genetics, we can heal at the root cause.

Welcome back to the PCOS Repair podcast, where today we’re going to be diving into that spiral of genetics and symptoms and our environment and how they all work together to either spiral upwards towards health or downwards towards worsening of our symptoms. So with that, this episode would truly be better on a more video format because I want you to visualize two things with me and if it’s easier, get a piece of paper and draw them out. They’re fairly simple, but sometimes words make it a little harder to picture in our heads. If you need to go back and listen to it a couple of times to really picture what I’m outlining here and illustrating here, do so. As you listen to my words here on the podcast, please picture with me two things. One is a pyramid, the other is a circle. To understand the domino effect and how root causes play together to worsen or improve our PCOS symptoms, It really starts by being able to picture these two processes going on simultaneously, and then we’ll talk about how they work together to form the pyramid of hormone imbalance, along with the engine of what’s driving those root causes and hormone imbalances to worsen or repair.

Let’s start with the circle. This is essentially a spiral that spins in the direction of PCOS symptoms getting worse or getting better. It goes like this. You have certain genetics that predispose you or make you sensitive to certain environmental and lifestyle factors. Those are going to be unique for each woman. There are several genetic factors. There’s several different things that we can to or respond to in our environment and in our lifestyle. That’s the first place where we see some uniqueness. Next, there is our lifestyle and our current environment. That’s what we’re currently living in. Then third, there is the symptoms that the combination of our genes and our environment produce but since many of our PCOS symptoms, such as weight, stress caused by symptoms or other factors, and cravings, fatigue and so forth that are part of our PCOS symptoms, they actually start to become part of our lifestyle and our environment, which can then continue and worsen that downward spiral. This is really important, this is a complex reality of PCOS. If you need to back up and listen to that again so that it fully sinks in what’s going on here, please do that because understanding this is the first key to understanding how PCOS root cause healing really works.

But essentially, even things that appear where to be our symptoms can begin to actually become a worsening aspect in our environment and lifestyle. That’s what keeps us not just spinning in place, but actually we see it worsening in things that may be used to work, stop working as well, and we start to have a harder and harder time with our PCOS symptoms and alleviating them. We have this spiral going on and genes that are being activated by our environment and our lifestyle leading to symptoms that further amplify the unhealthy aspects of our environment and lifestyle, further amplifying our genetic expression, leading to worsening and worsening symptoms. That downward spiral that we feel is when we start to feel like nothing is working, like we’re hitting our head against a wall. No matter what we try, our PCOS symptoms are blocking our ability to feel good and to feel healthy in our bodies.

All right, next we have the pyramid. Here I want you to picture that all of your hormones Hormones and root causes that are out of balance in the symptoms of the PCOS that you’re experiencing. The symptoms are probably up outside the top of the pyramid, but at the very, very top of the pyramid, these are the hormones that we frequently think of when it comes to PCOS. These are the ones that are frequently thought of, such as progesterone, luteinizing hormone, follicular stimulating hormone, so like LH or FSH, testosterone, and estrogen but honestly, these are just the victims of what’s going on lower in the pyramid. We’ll come back to this, but this is where birth control works. Okay, so birth control, the reason that people give it for PCOS is that it helps override these hormones at the very top of the pyramid, but it doesn’t do anything for the hormones deeper. In fact, it just masks the problem and potentially lets it get worse.

Okay, so as we work our way down the pyramid, next, we would have other possible conditions. These should be all ruled out during the diagnosing process of PCOS. You should have been evaluated for thyroid disease, potential other autoimmune diseases, and whether or not they ran specific tests for these or not, there should have at least been questions in the history that was taken when you saw your doctor that lowered or ruled out suspicion of these being an additional problem or potentially the cause of why you were having symptoms that mimicked PCOS. Next, we have inflammation. Inflammation is a normal thing in the human body chronic inflammation is just a state that how much inflammation we currently have is what creates problems. Our inflammation state typically, more or less, directly is correlated to our current state of health. As our health improves, our inflammation typically decreases, and as our health worsens, our inflammation typically worsens. That’s what we see with other disorders besides PCOS as well in the human body. This is a fairly common phenomenon where just our state of health creates or alleviates chronic inflammation. As we move farther down the pyramid, we start to get into some of the real big players of PCOS root causes. This will include things like insulin, which can be influenced both by the foods that we eat as well as our body composition. Then deeper down at the bottom of the pyramid, we have our stress hormone, cortisol. That can be influenced, again, with a bunch of other smaller hormones that play into the cortisol and stress process. We talked about that in a recent episode about more recent research of cortisol as well as the HPA axis. If you want to go back and listen to that episode, I think that was two weeks ago, I will put the link in the show notes below.

I get that this is hard to picture. If you’re having a hard time picturing the pyramid and then the circle, rewind, draw them out if you need to, jot them down just rudimentarily on a piece of paper. This isn’t anything too crazy, and that’s pretty much all that there is to say about the how they’re laid out. If you want to take a moment to go back and draw that out so that you can see it, if you’re a visual learner, I encourage you to do so. Otherwise, let’s continue on to how this pyramid and circle play together for the domino effect of our PCOS health. The hormone imbalances that are referred to in the PCOS arise from that bottom of the pyramid up. Then, like I’ve mentioned, too, the unique factor here in the pyramid is that not all women have all the same factors in that pyramid. Different root causes are the reason for those hormones at the top becoming imbalanced. In the pyramid, these are the factors that we want to consider and sort through as we determine and address your specific needs to reverse your PCOS. These factors in the pyramid are amplified or deamplified by the environment and lifestyle.

Going back over to that circle again. This is where they start playing together. Or another way to illustrate this is that the circle is the engine behind that pyramid hierarchy of hormone health. The question is, is our engine driving us towards health or away from it? Our engine, we can’t change our genetics, but we can change how our lifestyle and our environment is working to spiral our health up or down. This is the domino effect. Having the genetic tendency is like having all the dominoes set up but without any environmental factors working on them, these genetics are just simply sitting there. They’re not being knocked over, they’re not being activated in any way. They simply remain dormant but the good news is that the domino effect works both ways. It works to knock the dominoes down, worsening our health. It also works in reverse to raise those dominoes back up and to put our symptoms into a more dormant state. When we discover the root causes that are a factor in your specific pyramid. When you think about sorting through what’s going on in your root cause health of your PCOS symptoms, and most importantly, what environmental factors and lifestyle elements are contributing to them, and we make adjustments where needed to support your health and restore hormone balance, the hormones at the top of the pyramid there, and improve your symptoms over there in that circle by reversing that spiral to start having an upward spiral of health and healing.

That’s a lot to take in. That’s a lot of very technical, deep hormone health conversation, I tried to make it as simple as possible, I hope that those illustrations help you to see what’s going on in your body, in your hormone health, because sometimes it’s so easy to… We get this theory that, Oh, yeah, supposedly there’s these root cause hormones and somehow my environment is making them worse or better but hopefully that helps make sense. If there’s a hierarchy of how things relate to each other, and then there’s an engine where we’re either really putting the gas on making it worse or we’re putting the gas on reversing it and making it better with our engine of environmental and lifestyle factors.

Now, let’s transition on to what are some of the practical takeaways from this as we understand the domino effect of PCOS root cause health. First, this is why many health attempts fail when it comes to PCOS because without knowing what’s actually going on in your specific hormone pyramid and what environmental factors are driving it, the healing process becomes a guessing game. It is so hard to get it just right. So chances are we’re guessing wrong or we’re guessing just a little bit wrong or because we’ve guessed wrong so many times, we give up before we actually see the results that we want. The other key takeaway that I want you to see here is how connected each piece of the puzzle really is and how if we try to force the top of the pyramid hormones to behave or try quick fixes for symptoms, we always ultimately are met with failure. Examples of this are taking birth control to override hormone imbalances, while using birth control is not right or wrong, it is important to understand that it doesn’t address the root causes that are deeper in the pyramid, and so they may be, in fact, worsening while you’re masking their symptoms. Then, of course, for some people, birth control does not work at all as a PCOS way of relieving symptoms, so that’s one example. Another example is trying FAD diets and weight loss tricks to try and lose the PCOS symptom of weight gain. This is a hard one because we are told by our physicians that if we lost weight, our PCOS would improve. Well, that is true because remember how we talked about PCOS symptoms can actually start becoming part of the problem, weight is one of those. As we gain weight, it becomes an environment on its own right that starts to worsen our PCOS root causes.

If we can reduce our weight gain or lose some body fat, then our PCOS symptoms and those root causes start to do better and we start to see improvements. The problem, though, is that just trying to make the scale go down, it does not improve our root causes because the ways that we do that can increase cortisol, which defeats the whole purpose of the weight loss anyway. Another thing that we can end up doing is decreasing muscle mass through too heavily restricting our calories. We can create a lot more problems than we’re alleviating by trying the quick fix diet approach to weight loss but if you’re like me and most women with PCOS and you have tried one or both of these methods to improve your PCOS, please don’t beat yourself up about it. The useful information out there about PCOS is very limited, and there is a plethora of misguided information out there. So we’ve all made these mistakes. I’ve taken hormonal birth control, there are definitely reasons to take it, I’ve taken it when I didn’t know better, I’ve also taken it when I know it’s not helping my PCOS for other reasons.

We’ve all tried the quick fad weight loss tricks because when nothing’s working, we’re willing to try everything. So don’t beat yourself up about this. Practice some self-compassion. Learn from what you are hearing here today, learn from other episodes of the PCOS Repair podcast, and shake off what you’ve done in the past and move forward now knowing better to do better. So how do we discover and heal from the root cause? Well, Okay, so two ways here that I want you to take as we wrap up today. First, it’s about tracing these imbalances from symptoms to the root cause. One way that you can do that today is to take the PCOS root cause quiz. Another way that I do this with clients and women in my PCOS Root Cause Group programs is to go through a very, very detailed assessment to help determine what’s going on with your symptoms and what root causes they are pointing towards, and then dig linking a little deeper to make sure that you’re not missing anything or that there’s not a combination of things going on, and then ultimately linking that to where your PCOS problems are and what your desired outcomes are so that we can work towards those very seamlessly and efficiently.

Where you can get started today, if you haven’t already, take the quiz. It’s a really great place to start. It will help you to start gaining insights into what daily symptoms you may be experiencing that you may not have realized were related to your PCOS root causes because it’s not just the list of PCOS symptoms that determine what our root causes are. It’s actually a lot of other just daily life symptoms that we oftentimes start to think are normal because we’ve had them for so long. Second, make sure that you are on my email list. If you’re not getting weekly emails with a new podcast episode, you’re not on my email list. If you need to figure out how to get on the email list, you can send me a message over on Instagram @Nourishedtohealthy, and I’ll help make sure you’re all good there. The reason you want to be on the email list is that that way you will get notified and invited to my next more in-depth masterclass on this topic. That’ll be happening probably over the next few weeks. If you’re on my email list, you’ll get invited to all those types of additional learning where I can take you a little deeper, a little longer, a little beyond what I can talk about on a podcast, in part because there’ll be a video.

So that will make it easier to visualize and not have to try to picture what I’m talking about as we did on this episode today. So I know this episode is going to spark so many questions about PCOS, all of which I’m happy to answer over on Instagram. If you want to send me a message @Nourishedtohealthy, where you can find me, send me a DM, and I’m happy to answer any of your questions or point you to an episode that would be helpful so that you’re able to learn more about what you specifically are interested in when it comes to your PCOS health. Until next week, bye for now.

Take The PCOS Root Cause Quiz

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Results are not guaranteed. Please see Medical Disclaimer for more detail.

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Resilience in PCOS is crucial for overcoming challenges like irregular periods and emotional strains. Through self-awareness, self-care, and support, we empower ourselves to adapt and thrive. It’s a journey of self-compassion, problem-solving, and adaptability, requiring patience and ongoing effort. Embracing this process enables us to create lasting PCOS health and well-being.

About Show

Welcome to The PCOS Repair Podcast!

I’m Ashlene Korcek, and each week I’ll be sharing the latest findings on PCOS and how to make practical health changes to your lifestyle to repair your PCOS at the root cause.

If you’re struggling with PCOS, know that you’re not alone. In fact, it’s estimated that one in ten women have PCOS. But the good news is that there is a lot we can do to manage our symptoms and live healthy, happy lives.

So whether you’re looking for tips on nutrition, exercise, supplements, or mental health, you’ll find it all here on The PCOS Repair Podcast. Ready to get started? Hit subscribe now

Episode #89: Building Resilience in the Face of PCOS Challenges

Episode #89: Building Resilience in the Face of PCOS Challenges

Episode #89: Building Resilience in the Face of PCOS Challenges

This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my disclosure and privacy policy.

Building Resilience in the Face of PCOS Challenges

What you’ll learn in this episode

This episode dives into the significance of resilience in the context of PCOS struggles. Resilience is not just about bouncing back; it’s about thriving through adversity. Join me as we explore the importance of resilience in overcoming the physical and emotional hurdles of PCOS and discover actionable steps to cultivate resilience in your journey towards PCOS health.

Understanding Resilience:

PCOS presents a labyrinth of challenges, from physical symptoms like irregular periods and acne to emotional tolls such as anxiety and depression. Yet, resilience offers a guiding light amidst the darkness. It’s the ability to face dead ends and setbacks with determination, knowing that each obstacle is an opportunity for growth. Resilience empowers us to navigate the twists and turns of our PCOS journey with grace and fortitude.

Building Self-awareness:

Self-awareness is a crucial aspect of resilience. By understanding our thoughts, emotions, and triggers, we gain insight into our inner workings. Whether it’s recognizing the impact of stress on our well-being or identifying patterns in our behavior, self-awareness empowers us to make informed choices and navigate challenges more effectively.

By practicing self-compassion, building self-awareness, setting realistic goals, and seeking support, we nurture resilience as a guiding force in our journey toward PCOS health. Remember, healing takes time, but with resilience as our companion, we have the power to transform adversity into growth. Until next time, stay resilient and embrace the journey toward PCOS health.

Let’s Continue The Conversation

Do you have questions about this episode or other questions about PCOS? I would love to connect and chat on a more personal level over on Instagram. My DMs are my favorite place to chat more.

 

So go visit me on IG @nourishedtohealthy.com

 

Let’s Continue The Conversation

Do you have questions about this episode or other questions about PCOS? I would love to connect and chat on a more personal level over on Instagram. My DMs are my favorite place to chat more.

 

So go visit me on IG @nourishedtohealthy.com

 

rate the podcast

Spread the Awareness

If you have found this podcast helpful please take just a moment to rate it and leave a review. This helps apple, spotify or whichever platform you use know to share this podcast with other women. I truely appreciate your help supporting as many women as possible

Read The Full Episode Transcript Here

PCOS presents a unique set of challenges, both physical and emotional, that can feel overwhelming. Resilience isn’t just about bouncing back from adversity, it’s about growing through it. Throughout this episode, we’ll be exploring what resilience really means in the context of PCOS and why it’s so important, and most importantly, how you can cultivate it in your own life. So whether you’re struggling with irregular periods, battling acne, or feeling overwhelmed by the emotional tolls of PCOS, this episode will have many helpful, actionable steps. So let’s dive in and discover how you can strengthen your resilience muscle and thrive in the face of PCOS challenges.

You’re listening to the PCOS Repair podcast, where we explore the ins and outs of PCOS tests on how to repair the imbalances in your hormones naturally with a little medical help sprinkled in. Hi, I’m Ashlene Korcek, and with many years of medical and personal experience with polycystic ovarian syndrome, it is my joy to watch women reverse their PCOS as they learn to nourish their body in a whole new way. With the power of our beliefs, our mindset, and our environment, and the understanding of our genetics, we can heal at the root cause.

Welcome back to the PCOS Repair podcast, where today we’re going to be diving into the importance of creating resilience in the face of PCOS struggles. Resilience is like a muscle that over time gets stronger and stronger as we navigate the ups and downs of a chronic condition such as PCOS. It’s about finding ways to adapt and thrive despite the obstacles in our path, whether it’s dealing with symptoms of irregular periods or acne, or whether it’s the emotional toll and the body image that has us down, learning how to take the slow and steady route by incorporating resilience into our repertoire of coping mechanisms for dealing with PCOS and creating PCOS health is a very, very, very important step. Navigating the challenges of PCOS can feel like trying to find your way through an intricate maze, a very challenging maze, and It can feel like you’re hitting a lot of dead ends. This is where when we develop resilience, we start to hit those dead ends and say, Hey, look, I’ve hit dead ends before. I can back up, backtrack, restart this, renavigate this, and get back on track. That’s, in my mind, the way I view how I use and harness resilience in my PCOS path.

Even once we figure out our PCOS health, which I did many years ago in order to get pregnant with my daughter, each year, our body changes, and as we get older, and we have new hurdles that come to us. When we have developed that ability to hit a dead end in that intricate maze of PCOS obstacles, we are able to use it as a way to grow deeper into our health rather than a wall that knocks us down and throws us off of our PCOS health journey altogether. From the physical symptoms that disrupt our daily routines, so PCOS just infiltrates all things, to the emotional toll that weighs heavy on our hearts, PCOS presents a myriad of obstacles that we need to overcome in order to really feel like we have established health in our life alongside our PCOS. The irregular periods, acne, outbreaks, and weight fluctuations can lead us just feeling like everything is against us. This is where we’re digging into some of these things today in this episode that can feel really negative. The reason is because they’re the very things that require our resilience, require our ability to say, Hey, you know what? These things are here. We have to accept them, they’re part of our PCOS journey, but they don’t have to hold us down. There are ways that we can work around them, ways that we can work through them, and that is what resilience is all about.

While there is this emotional roller coaster and the added mental health tools of anxiety and depression made worse by if you’re dealing with infertility or body image struggles, there is a sense that our self-worth can really be shaken to the core when it comes to PCOS. This is where our resilience is tested to the extreme. It’s one thing to be frustrated by a symptom such as hair on our chin. As frustrating as that is and as some days that can really weigh on us and get us down, Thank God for tweezers, thank God for lasers, thank God for laser hair removal. These things are not as insurmountable but when it gets to our sense of self-worth, and it can be hair on our chins that affects our self-worth, self-worth but when it gets that deep inside of us, that is when it really wins and that is where having the ability to hit those dead ends in the maze and not allow them to get into that core of our self-worth, that is where resilience is our ally.

So despite these hurdles, it is essential to remember that you are not alone in this battle and that I’m here to support you with the PCOS Repair podcast. I’m here to support my private clients and my group coaching clients to help you understand your root causes, to help you understand how your environment plays into those, and cultivate that resilience to emerge stronger on the other side. So on to the good stuff, so I keep throwing around this word resilient. What do I mean by the word resilient? How do we actually build resilience in the face of PCOS? and how does that even all start? What are the actionable steps here? Because it all sounds great, we have this muscle of resilience, but where does it start? It really starts, like so many things, with a mindset shift. We need to cultivate the self-compassion, which is easier said than done and we need to challenge those negative thoughts that creep in, which starts by recognizing them. If you can journal, if you can even on a post a note, when something negative comes up for you, even as frustration or feeling irritable or feeling down, feeling sad, feeling low, those feelings. If you can just take a post-it note, keep a pad of paper, just jot it down because sometimes when we’re in the midst of it, we’re not in the mood to deal with it. We’re not in the mood to dissect those feelings or fix those negative thoughts in the moment. But if we set them down, and then in our quiet time, in a more active meditation, or maybe on a walk, or somewhere where you have a more peaceful, centered mindset, it’s a really good time to unpack those negative emotions, those negative feelings, those sad feelings, those feelings of feeling stuck overwhelmed or at a dead end, hopeless, whatever those feelings are that are coming up for you. When we catch those negative feelings, then we can start to cultivate the self-compassion. So put yourself in a third body or imagine it was your friend or a loved one that came to you with these concerns. What would you tell them? How would you think about them for them? We can be so critical on ourselves that sometimes it’s best to just step outside of ourselves and think of it as if we were thinking of another person.

What would we say to them? What would we be thinking for them? What would we be wanting for them, caring about them? That’s maybe where our self-compassion starts and then if you notice, one of the places where I suggested dealing with these thoughts and emotions is through the practice of self-care, through the practice of a more active meditation state, through a walk. Now, you can’t write them down as easily, but you could process these in a hot shower, in a hot bath, in a place where you’re taking care of you. When you are taking care of you, it’s amazing how all of a sudden, even though it may seem like a one more thing on your to-do list, putting on your sneakers, walking outside, especially if the day is slightly sunny, especially here I’m recording this at the time of winter, if we can get out and get a little bit of sunshine or even just a little bit of light skies, even through clouds, even in rain, getting that fresh air, there’s something that happens inside of us that feels taken care of. That’s something that sometimes as adults, we don’t feel very often is being taken care of but going and doing something like a hot bath or a walk, there’s other options too, but something that makes you feel cared for in that capacity, All of a sudden, we’re able to get into that place of self-compassion. Through prioritizing some self-care, some self-prioritization, we can all of a sudden begin practicing some self-compassion to these things that we feel like are dead end. As we start to be more compassionate, providing ourselves with more grace, all of a sudden, we are able to start taking charge, thinking of positive ways that we can begin to prioritize and optimize our nutrition and our exercise, and including getting plenty of rest into our day. Another way in which we can cultivate the resilience muscle is to seek support. We can seek support through friends and family, family that are able to be supportive. Sometimes family and friends are not able to be supportive, and they wouldn’t be a good choice to bring into your circle for a support standpoint. They can be excellent friends and family, but they may not be who you look to for support. If you have friends and family that you can look to for support, sharing some of what you’re dealing with and working towards with them can be very beneficial.

Finding somebody to work with that understands PCOS, this is how I support women with PCOS when I’m working with them one-on-one or in group programs, and being able to feel heard and seen and understood, as well as in the capacity of how I work with women, actually getting a lot of your questions answered and assistance in navigating the hurdles of PCOS. But just feeling supported can be a huge step in being able to pick yourself up and continue forward when we hit those dead ends and roadblocks on our journey to PCOS health. Then what are the steps for actually creating resilience? I like to keep things really logical, really practical. I have 10 steps here that I tend to think are really important in all areas of creating PCOS health, but particularly when it comes to developing a resilience that allows us to really play the long game here in creating the health that we want. The first one is creating self-awareness. This takes time understanding your thoughts and emotions, but that’s where, again, writing down how you feel, what you’re feeling. You don’t have to in the moment, understand why, but just writing it down and then coming back to it later because when you come back to it later, you may find that, you know what? I was hungry, I had low blood sugar and I was just crabby and I needed to eat lunch. You may find that you didn’t sleep well the night before, but you don’t know that in the minute. When you back up, when you’re feeling better and you’re like, Oh, I probably just didn’t feel good because I was coming down with a cold, which you don’t know yet because you’re not sick till the next day or you’re like, Oh, I didn’t sleep well that last night and so that’s probably why I felt that way. Sometimes it’s just becoming aware and then realizing that we have these downer moments, these frustrations but as we start to back up and become more aware of why, and sometimes it’s more of a why. There’s a real reason there, there’s more going on, and we need to dig into it further but as we realize that, you know what? We have these moments of feeling really down and they pass, and there’s usually some reason for them, all of a sudden, even when you’re in those moments, they don’t feel like they have as powerful of a hold on you because over time, as we cultivate self-awareness, we begin to realize that we all have these moods, these moods are normal, these moods pass, sometimes there’s things that we do to help them pass. Sometimes they pass by just eating our next meal, sometimes they pass by getting enough sleep, sometimes they pass by getting outside and getting some fresh air, sometimes they pass by sitting down and making a plan for what we need to do to get a hold of how we’re feeling, what’s going on in our life, so that we can move forward a positive way we talked about.

Step two is practicing self-care. This is just a form of prioritizing your physical and mental needs. We live in a society where we so often get pulled in so many directions to help everybody else with their needs. If we’re not taking care of our nutrition, our sleep, our need for relaxation and unwinding, and our need for getting proper movement in our day so that our bodies feel like they’re at their best, we’re not able to show up in our best form for any aspect of our life. Practicing self-care is so important, and it helps us with all the other steps here in this 10-step list that we’re talking about. Developing a support network, this includes both friends, family, and professional help to get your health and your life on track where you want it to be. We can’t do all this alone, we only know what we know, if we don’t step out and ask for support where needed, We stay stuck and frustrated at why we are stuck. I strongly encourage you to step out of your comfort zone when it comes to asking for support and developing a supporting network.

Number four is to foster optimism. In the moment when we’re having negative emotions, when we’re feeling frustrated, when we’re angry, when we feel down about the hurdles that we continually run into with PCOS, that is not a moment where optimism comes easily to us but as we step back and realize how many things that we have overcome. I mean, even just seeing your post-it note of how you were feeling and then realizing that you moved past that into a place where you were able to deal with that. The more that we develop that trust in ourselves, that we can move past hard things, that we can work through hard things, the more that we start to be optimistic that this is manageable, that this is possible, that I just need to figure out how to do it and figure out how it’s going to work for me, and I need to incorporate it into my day, and voila, I can do this. I can do all things when I back up and take it step by step. It’s easy to get overwhelmed when you look at the whole thing of what may be asked of you, but when we break it down into bite-sized pieces, all of a sudden, things can seem a lot more manageable. Then there’s the emotional side and the more theoretical side of optimism. This is where we start to realize that good things do happen to us. In the moment when we’re down, it can feel like nothing good happens to us but if we back up and we look at all the things that we’re grateful for, all the things that we have achieved in our life, big and small, we can start to realize that, you know what? In the moment, it can seem like this is impossible but when we back up and we see our life as a whole, all of a sudden, this thing that we’re wanting to do, this thing that we’re wanting to create, or this hurdle that we’re trying to get past, can all of a sudden seem a little smaller in the scheme of the map of our entire life and what we’ve accomplished so far.

Number five is to set realistic goals and expectations, that’s like that bite-size piece that we were just talking about as we foster optimism but also expectations. I think sometimes we can get ourselves so down when we expect things to happen right away. I think more than ever in our current culture, everything is instant gratification, and everything is marketed as quick fixes and tips and tricks and hacks for this and how to do things the fastest way possible. The problem is when it comes to hormone health, nothing happens fast. Nothing got out of order fast, and nothing repairs itself fast. It’s a process, and it’s a step-by-step process. Sometimes, when we think about problematic periods, ovulation, and fertility, what happens is that we may have an irregular period or an absent period. Recovering a period will start with the period returning to a semi-regular pattern. This could take a month or two to get your first period back, and then it can take 3-6 months for those periods to become regular. Once those periods become regular, that is, in my of thinking about it and talking about it with women is that that’s almost when we start repairing ovulation.

Ovulation has been happening on and off throughout you getting those random sporadic periods working towards becoming regular again but it’s not until they are regular that your ovulation strength really has the ability to build. You may have been having an ovulation, you may have been having a pseudo ovulation. This is where it’s like there’s not an exact term when we talk about ovulation strength. That’s not really a great scientific term either but essentially what’s happening is that are those FSH hormones elevating enough to mature a follicle to become an egg? Then is your LH hormone being elevated high enough to truly release that egg, or did we just get a more mature follicle? Then three, through all of that, those hormones signal progesterone, and other things also signal progesterone, to be high enough to, If you do ovulate to maintain the environment needed to allow pregnancy to occur. All of this happens in stages. First, we must recover the period. Then we strengthen ovulation and progesterone rises, and then we can sustain a pregnancy through that first trimester, which is the most delicate part when it comes to the PCOS hormones. After the first trimester, then we get into some root cause hormones of, are you at risk for things like gestational diabetes and things like that that we’re managing but for the beginning part, it’s just, can we get you through that first trimester? Even just halfway through the first trimester, once that placenta takes over, you have such an easier time because you’re not so reliant on these finicky hormones of PCOS. That is how we lay out what is realistic to expect in that. This is nothing like taking a Provera pill and inducing a period. That happens like this, and we expect our bodies to bounce back like a pharmaceutical.

Our expectations, and this is where resilience is so important, is that we are going to have to go through a few months of not quite getting the result that we want, but showing forward progress. Sometimes it’s two steps forward, one step back. That optimism is looking at that two steps forward, and the resilience comes in dealing with that one step back. This is also intertwined as we really develop that resilience to push through so that as we develop those realistic expectations, we can set ourselves up for long-term healing and better periods, optimized fertility, better weight management, all the things that don’t happen overnight.

Number 6 is adaptability, everyone’s journey is going to look different. What we started out thinking everything isn’t always the way things go. I mean, a really good example is people wanting to start a family, and then they get diagnosed with PCOS when it’s not going as planned. This is an unexpected curve ball. They are part of life. They are not the most fun part of life, but some of the best things in life come out of them. When we start to recognize that and see that, some of the crappiest things of life also come out of these hurdles but it’s a little bit of what we make it, especially when it comes to PCOS. What I encourage you when it comes to adaptability is almost more of allowing yourself to be flexible, allowing yourself to take the right of the journey, constantly looking at What does my body need? What is it that we need to adjust and fix? Where can I assist my body in getting to where it is we want to go, and what other things may I need to employ? I think it was last week, I had an where I got to share Mia’s story on how she incorporated IVF into her PCOS fertility journey and how even though she looked for outside help beyond just natural healing and reversing of her PCOS, how she was able to be so much more successful when she included the emotional and physical healing elements of PCOS along with modern medical advances of IVF.

That is an example of adaptability to where her IVF wasn’t working by itself, and she looked for other ways to help it. Some people do the opposite. They’re looking to heal their PCOS naturally, and they get such great results, and then they’re still not able to achieve pregnancy or maintain a pregnancy, and so they also incorporate some additional medical assistance to help them achieve their goal of starting a family and getting pregnant and sustaining a healthy pregnancy to term. Being able to not be so fixated on one way of doing things to achieve an outcome, a time frame of an outcome, a exact look of how an outcome is going to come about allows us so much more ease on our journey. It’s funny, the more we hold on to a certain way of things coming about, the more we struggle to get them to happen. Being able to cultivate adaptability as one of the steps of developing resilience as we navigate this maze of PCOS health is a really really important step. It’s going to look so different for every person. It’s one of the ones I think is very difficult because we have an idea of how we want our life to go, and we have our five-year plans and our 10-year plans and our plans for the week and our plans for the day.

When it comes to PCOS health, sometimes there is an alternative plan that your body has for how things are going to go. That can be frustrating and a difficult pill to swallow but the more that we can embrace that and recognize that and incorporate some flexibility in that plan, the better. For me, this took the mindset of, as I made my appointment to see an infertility specialist, I was coming to terms and admitting to myself that my fertility journey wasn’t going the way I expected. I expected to discontinue birth control, and then a month or two later, be announcing to friends and family that we were expecting our first baby and that’s not how my journey went. My journey went where we discontinued birth control. Twelve months later, I still wasn’t pregnant, and I was diagnosed with PCOS. Then from there, I had several days of emotional hell. Then as I made the appointment, as I was willing to dial the number for the fertility office, I was basically accepting in that moment that I was going to start a journey that I didn’t have control over. My story to my first pregnancy ended prior to actually starting any treatment with the infertility specialist, but I did go through all of the screening and for several appointments, and I was going to be starting my infertility medications the next day I was going to my appointment to get those.

I found that I was pregnant the night before, having had the mindset shift that I was going to do everything possible during the four months that I was waiting for the appointment after I was brave enough to make that call, that I was going to get myself physically and emotionally as ready as possible to take on that journey that I was going to have to give up control over and so it was in that moment of allowing some adaptability to my situation in that a huge shift happened for me in my health and in my journey to becoming a mommy. A very hard step, I think that’s maybe as I go through these here on the podcast, I think that may be one of the hardest steps, but I encourage you to embrace it because it is so powerful and important to allow some adaptability, flexibility into your PCOS healing path. Developing the problem-solving skills. This is where all of the root cause learning really comes in, and learning how to create an environment and a lifestyle that takes into account your root causes and your symptoms and what your body is needing from you, but also incorporating them into your daily life in a life that works for you, a life that you enjoy. That takes a lot of problem solving, a willingness to have curiosity, a willingness to experiment and play with it and not take it all too seriously, but to have a lot of fun in the journey of experimenting what’s working both for your body and then also with your it’s working for you personally in your life. Where those two meet, that’s the perfect PCOS lifestyle for you. It takes some problem solving skills that you have to develop along the way.

Okay, so then step number eight is maintaining a perspective. This is a really important one, we can get so deep in a fog of PCOS problems and frustrations and dead ends that sometimes we lose perspective altogether. This is where, again, in the moment where we’re losing perspective, maybe not be the time to force yourself to get perspective but again, jotting down how you’re feeling, what’s going on, and then later on, taking a step back and getting some perspective. How far have you come? When we get frustrated, say, with our weight, maybe you’ve hit a plateau, maybe you were doing great, maybe then you went on vacation and you’re coming back and you’re having a hard time getting that momentum built up again. That can be just demoralizing frustrating, and it can feel like a huge dead end but if we back up in a calmer moment when we’re not as frustrated, we can see that, you know what? At the beginning of what created the momentum last time, maybe we were more strict, maybe we were doing things that we’re not doing right now and expecting results of when we were doing things differently. So gaining some perspective is so important that all along the way, it’s like we can gain perspective at the beginning because it’s like, Okay, I need to learn these things, and I need to see what’s going on and we put some effort when we’re starting something new into gaining perspective but then we think, Well, I did that already but sometimes we need to remember to do it all along the way and so that’s step number eight.

And then step number nine, we mentioned briefly before, but practicing self-compassion and that’s where we have to remember to be kind to ourselves. We’re learning this for the first time, too, and this isn’t easy stuff and so remembering that these challenges are just that, they’re challenges. The fact that we are meeting them head-on to the best of our ability requires a great deal of grace and self-compassion along the way.

Then 10, what I want to run along with finding support, is that seeking help. I put this in two different ways. One, get support, two, seek help. These aren’t things that you’ve done before, you’re going to have an easier time if you seek the help of someone like myself who understands the PCOS struggles as well as the intricacies of how the root causes work and how the lifestyle factors factor in to assist you in caring for your body in the way that it needs but in whatever arena, in whatever realm you’re needing help, I strongly, strongly encourage you to get the help that you need because at the end of the day, it will help you go faster, it will help you be less frustrated, it will help you feel more clear, and it will help you feel more calm and supported as you navigate these hurdles and dead ends and struggles and challenges and triumphs and successes of reversing your PCOS and discovering your path to PCOS health. With that, an overview of this process, because we get lost in the steps sometimes, is that when you build resilience, it allows you to bounce back and get back on your feet as you work through your PCOS struggles to gain a new level of PCOS health.

Every time we want to make a little bit of progress, there’s going to be bumps in the road. It’s just part of the growing process but it requires a willingness to embrace this challenge and to embrace changes and to experiment with what is working or what doesn’t work, and some trial and error. Life is full of unexpected things, but it can feel uncomfortable at times. Even when we feel like we’ve gotten into a groove of things with our PCOS health, there’ll be times where, like I was saying, with the weight loss, you’ll hit a plateau, you’ll hit a point where you’re going to need to shake things up again or go a little deeper. Then finally, building resilience is an ongoing process, this isn’t something that we do once and then we’re done with, this is something that is a lifelong opportunity to continue to grow in yourself, in your ability, in who you are as a person. It’s something that requires a great deal of practice and patience. All holistic things when it comes to PCOS, they’re not quick fixes, they don’t happen overnight and so by allowing yourself to slowly take the next step, take the next step, and gradually over time, through consistent effort, you are going to see an incredible change in where you’re at today and where you’ll be a month from now, a year from now, five years from now in your PCOS health.

So in conclusion today, I would love to hear in my inbox on Instagram. So send me a DM over on Instagram @Nourishedtohealthy. I would love to hear one of the areas that you are going to give yourself some self-compassion this week so that you can cultivate some resilience by allowing yourself to be in the process. If we expect ourselves to already be perfect, we don’t allow for the growth, for the discovery, for the learning, for the creating of a lifestyle that works for us, we just expect it to already be there, and when it’s not, we get frustrated and so by allowing ourselves to cultivate first the self-compassion that we are on a journey, that this is a process, and that we’re not going to be perfect at it, we’re able to actually get started with the action of healing our PCOS, repairing our root cause hormones, and creating the health that we want. In my DMs this week, I would welcome any questions anytime, but I would specifically love to hear, where are you going to be cultivating and creating and giving yourself some self-compassion this week. I look forward to hearing from you in my DMs. Until next week, bye for now.

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Welcome to The PCOS Repair Podcast!

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Let’s Continue The Conversation

Do you have questions about this episode or other questions about PCOS? I would love to connect and chat on a more personal level over on Instagram. My DMs are my favorite place to chat more.

 

So go visit me on IG @nourishedtohealthy.com

 

Let’s Continue The Conversation

Do you have questions about this episode or other questions about PCOS? I would love to connect and chat on a more personal level over on Instagram. My DMs are my favorite place to chat more.

 

So go visit me on IG @nourishedtohealthy.com

 

Resources & References Mentioned in this episode

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Read The Full Episode Transcript Here

This week’s episode is another journal article where we’re going to review a lot of the myths around PCOS, and particularly when it involves stress and the hormone cortisol and our PCOS root causes. This research article explores the role of the adrenal and the HPA axis in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome, and in particular, its relationship to our coping mechanisms and environmental stressors and so forth in our life. So without further ado, let’s dive in.

You’re listening to the PCOS Repair podcast, where we explore the ins and outs of PCOS and how to repair the imbalances in your hormones naturally with a little medical help sprinkled in. Hi, I’m Ashlene Korcek, and with many years of medical and personal experience with polycystic ovarian syndrome, it is my joy to watch women reverse their PCOS as they learn to nourish their body in a whole new way. With the power of our beliefs, our mindset, and our environment, and the understanding of our genetics, we can heal at the root cause.

Welcome back to the PCOS Repair podcast, where today we’re going to review a journal article that I really loved, and I know you’re going to, too. We spend a lot of time here on the podcast talking about root causes. In today’s episode, we’re going to dive a little bit deeper into the research of one avenue of root causes, in particular, cortisol. This article goes into some amazing content and discussion on how so many of our root causes and environmental factors and our genetics are all so intertwined, and it goes back and forth, where one will worsen or get better It has the same net effect back and forth on the other. You’re going to see that in our discussion today. While this article was a very intense read, and I have linked it in the show notes for your reading pleasure, should you choose to read the whole article, but I think you’ll find this review and conversation on today’s episode very helpful in having a better understanding of that connection and view into how root causes affect our hormone production and our hormone dysregulation and imbalances. While we are focusing on stress and cortisol today, the same goes for all the other root causes. This is how they work in our body. There isn’t a very simple linear progression of these root causes. They are very interconnected. You’ll see that in today’s episode. All right.

The full episode, like I said, is linked in the show notes. The title of this article for reference is Cortisol and the Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. It is by Renato Pascale and Asandra Gabaneri. It was published in the Expert Review of Endocrinology and Metabolism Journal. A few scientific terms that I’m going to try to keep this really plain English because the journal article, if you want to read it, has plenty of very scientific terms but a few terms I just want to review and make sure that you are familiar with before we get started. Androgenic, these are our androgen hormones, and these are going to include our sex hormones. Particularly in this episode, when I say androgenic hormones, the main one we’re talking about is testosterone. Although your other reproductive hormones do get involved, testosterone is the driving one. Testosterone is the one that’s going to adjust or mess up your LH levels and so forth. The main one we’re talking about here is testosterone but that’s where we use the word androgenic. The HPA axis this is your hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis. Basically, this is talking about how our hypothalamus and our pituitary, which are part of our hormone-regulating systems, and our adrenals that sit on top of our kidneys that produce hormones and androgens, cortisol has a very big role on the adrenal gland. This is where that triangle, that axis, is what we’re talking about with fat and how they get involved. Basically, it’s how our environment, our genetics, and responses all work together and why it affects our hormones. Then adipose tissue, which is just excess fat. Sometimes I like to use that term specifically because weight on a scale is not what we’re talking about here. We’re talking about excess fat tissue in regards to our cortisol and insulin pathways in the body because the excess weight on the scale could be excess muscle, dense bones, and so forth. What we’re really talking about here is, do we have excess fat tissue that is getting involved in these pathways. Then cortisol, this is our stress hormone, insulin is the hormone that is released by the pancreas after eating to tell our cells, our body cells, to take the glucose, the blood sugar, into the cells so that we can use it as energy but it also has many other side jobs in the body that we will be discussing here in this review.

In this article, it really emphasized the impact of these metabolic factors. The main metabolic factors that we’re talking about here include insulin. Our body composition, in particular, if we have excess adipose tissue, we don’t even have to necessarily be in a certain BMI category, but if we have that excess adipose tissue to whatever level our body is struggling, and I think this is something that is often misunderstood. If we are excessively overweight, it becomes obvious but what about people that are in the healthy to slightly overweight? Some of those women actually do struggle with a little bit extra adipose tissue as well, signaling to have a higher insulin response and signaling for more androgen response. This is where that sweet spot for you comes in. As we find our sweet spot in our weight management and in our body composition, we find that our body starts to really work with us. Those are the symptoms that we are looking for to find our sweet spot. Everyone has a different one. Some people can accommodate a lot more fat tissue than others.

That’s where it gets a little bit unique to each woman. Then we have the HPA axis that’s going to have all of these talking together. Then the other metabolic factor is cortisol. In PCOS, cortisol production may be completely normal but the adrenal androgens may be overproducing for some women with PCOS. This is something where perhaps it’s a genetic factor, perhaps this is where we need further research as why this is happening but we have seen in research that women with PCOS, a subset of women, somewhere between 20% to 30% of women with PCOS, seem to be producing normal levels of cortisol. If you did a cortisol test, their levels would be normal, but their adrenal androgens, so the androgens produced by the adrenal glands are being overproduced. So this could be due to higher levels of cortisol or just the cortisol in general. So it’s hard to say. When it comes to hormones, there is a range of normal and are we just more sensitive as women with PCOS? Are our bodies wanting a lower level? And so if we’re on the high end of normal, so these are all questions of where exactly is that excess or that response of excess, even though the cortisol levels are normal, but that metabolism is disrupting in our PCOS, and it continues to have this adrenal hyperandrogenic state in. Basically, our adrenals are producing too many androgens.

Even though we’re doing a lot of things well, our stress response is somehow telling our body to create too many hormones. Then another interesting point the article made is that, and they go way into this, I’m not going to go way into this because we’ve talked about eating and PCOS in other episodes, but they pose an interesting question. This is like a chicken or the egg type of question. Is the overactivity of the HPA axis in PCOS, it seems to be linked to a prevalence of eating disorders but is this because we have this hyperandrogen state and we’re trying to compensate for it and we’re using tactics that lead to eating disorders, or are we having eating disorders because our body is not handling the stress well? and so is the chronic stress exposure leading to a state of hormones that then is leading to eating disorders, such as cravings and things that we, as a society, have just deemed not good for us. Then on the back end, we’re trying to correct for that and create an eating disorder or is it that our hormones are making it difficult to get our body to function correctly through excess androgen production, and we’re trying to cope with it through means of eating that lead to eating disorders?

You can see, did we come from it from this angle or did we come from the other angle? Then what part of that in the psychology of all of this is our mindset and our ability to make food choices and be the one that’s dictating those food choices as compared to being pulled by our body, what to do, and not having a very active role in those choices. This is where we include that we have a pathology, so our PCOS pathology and how our body functions. There’s definitely a genetic component that we’ve seen in PCOS, and we’ll talk about how that plays into the HPA access later on in this episode but also then we have our lifestyle choices and the psychology and mindset portion of that. When all of those come together, it creates this link of one leads to another, worsens another, and then it just continues in this one thing worsened, spiral effect, or one thing gets better, spiral effect. We see this very interconnection between our environment, our body, our hormones and how all of it functions together for improvement or for worsening.

Another area is we see the metabolic abnormalities, these ones that we have just been talking about, such as insulin resistance, especially excess or obesity in women with PCOS. These are common things that we see in their own right, and we lump them in their own categories of, Oh, if you lost weight, your PCOS would get better, or, you have PCOS, you’re at risk of insulin resistance, or you have insulin resistance. Then we talk about, now in this episode, we’re talking about PCOS and stress but here’s the thing, they’re all interconnected. Now, we may have one, and this is where getting into your root causes is really important. We may have one that is a primary primary source, and we have things that are feeding into that primary source. This is where discovering which of these sources is really the driving factor for you is so important because they are all interconnected. They are a part of all of this for everyone but some of them are less of a key factor and less important to address than others for each individual woman. These metabolic factors play a huge role in the PCOS pathology that then leads our symptoms. A big one is that as insulin, which synergizes with the luteinizing hormone, LH, it amplifies the ovarian androgen production.

Now, not only do we have cortisol, increasing our adrenal androgen production but cortisol raises insulin levels, and insulin levels then, through LH, amplifies our ovarian androgen production. You can see how very quickly we have magnified the magnitude of androgen productions quite extensively through various pathways that are all talking together. In the evaluation of adrenal androgens for PCOS, we find that about 20 to 30% of women that have been diagnosed with PCOS in studies, again, this is in small cohorts of studies, so we don’t have a huge global estimation here, but it appears that somewhere between 20 and 30% of women with PCOS have this androgen aspect involved. It’s usually primarily detected by elevated dihydrotestosterone sulfate, this is your DHEAS levels. If those levels If you’re elevated, you may have some degree of adrenal dysfunction playing into your PCOS root causes. We briefly mentioned weight as a part of this puzzle. How does it impact PCOS, and in particular, the cortisol levels, this becomes a pivotal factor influencing the HPA axis and the activity in PCOS.

Investigations into the Diverse Obesity Phenotype. When you think about the phenotype, this is how do people carry their weight. Do you carry it around the midsection? Do you carry it more in the hips and thighs? Are you more all over, evenly distributed of excess weight? We all know, even if you’re currently at a healthy weight, we all tend to know where would we gain weight if we were gain weight. That’s your phenotype of obesity. Whether or not you are categorized as overweight or not, that would be your phenotype. This reveals some of the disruptions that we see. Usually, women that have more of an abdominal phenotype of obesity tend to have a higher secretion of cortisol. They tend to see this as a bigger player in their adrenal type PCOS or their adrenal component of their PCOS and their stress responses. Remember how we talked about, usually, cortisol levels with PCOS are normal. That’s not what we’re looking for, per se, when we’re looking at the stress involvement. We’re looking at that laboratory value of DHEAS but women that have excess weight or have the BMI that’s reaching the obesity range, they may have elevated cortisol on a 24-hour cortisol test. That’s something where we see even a higher indication of this a problem and wanting to dive into that stress management as a root cause of PCOS, because this is really going to almost take it like a side route, and it’s going to be making its own hormone dysfunction even besides the PCOS ones, and it’s going to amplify that response, but it’s actually a whole side story going on that we would want to get under control. It mimics PCOS, but this is where it’s really important to dive into those root causes because we actually have a whole side story going on that we want to clean up in order to start seeing the results that you want. Then we also have to look into what’s going on with the insulin, cortisol tends to raise insulin, insulin can be raised by the foods that we’re eating, our body composition, by our exercise or lack thereof, can all affect insulin. Insulin’s role is found that it will increase the ovarian androgen production. This is important because we’re looking at the overall levels of the that’s the tip of that pyramid or that iceberg, so to speak, of where our PCOS symptoms are coming from, the excess facial hair, the period problems, all of those things are coming from the androgens. When we’re diving back down into these root causes of what are causing these excess in androgens. The insulin tends to have an independent rate of production in its own pathway. Remember, there was the side story of what’s going on with obesity and cortisol. Now we have a side story of what is going with insulin and androgens.

This is where we want to, again, look at those root causes, and cortisol stress management can all be at the root of both of these side stories. One of the medications that this study mentioned is pioglitazone, and that is one that is particularly showing some improvement of managing the insulin levels, making things more insulin sensitive but again, if we’re just pouring out the insulin because of a stress response, it may or may not not be as helpful. This is where we’re seeing some mixed results in some of the diabetic medications that are supposed to make us more insulin sensitive and why, again, we need to look deeper into some of those root causes. Then metformin had mixed results. We have to question, is that because of what’s going on deeper in the root causes when it comes to cortisol, or is it because it’s not that effective of a medication? But this is why these medications are beginning to become more popular and being offered to women with PCOS. You have to make your own decision on whether or not you feel like that’s the right route for you but that’s why they’re becoming more and more prescribed, even if you do not meet the parameters in lab tests for insulin resistance or prediabetes.

Okay, so then we have the genetic role of all of this, what are the genetics of the HPA axis in regards to PCOS? This is where we have very limited research. When we’ve looked at the genetics of PCOS, we see lots of different areas of our genetics that can have involvement. We definitely have seen some that increase our tendency towards inflammation, and definitely a lot of areas in our genetics that show increased tendencies towards insulin dysregulation but the HPA axis has been a little more elusive, but studies are definitely suggesting that there is a genetic basis for the adrenal androgen excess observed in PCOS. The reason we think this is not so much because of specific genetics that they have found, but there are sibling correlations where adrenal excess has been seen in sisters and also other family members. When we’re looking at those, specifically for this study, they were looking at the adrenal component, so I’m guessing that they were looking at the lab work of DHEAS but definitely more research is needed to connect the dots and create the links on the genetic basis of the adrenal androgen production.

However, we do see that there is some indication there but when it comes to our PCOS, from a practical standpoint, our genetics can’t be altered. While interesting scientifically, I don’t get too hung up on the genetics because clearly our body is functioning a certain way. It’s the body we have, whether it was passed down or however we ended up with it. This is how our body is functioning, from a practical level, I don’t get too hung up on what the genetic component is, but it is interesting, and the research article did bring it up.

In closing, I want to point out a few things. This episode, we are talking about the research of cortisol of stress and PCOS but before I leave you today, I do want to include some of the episodes where we have talked about management of stress in a more practical and applicable point of view, because I want you to go back and listen to those if you’re feeling like this may be something that is ringing true for you. The purpose of these research articles is I want you to see that this isn’t something where it’s a bunch of theory, these are things that the research is finding. The problem is that they haven’t been applied to modern medicine in a treatment modality because so much of it comes into lifestyle treatment. That’s not something that our doctor’s offices are equipped to handle, walking you through dietary changes and exercise plans and so forth. But they do pull out where medications are helpful and can offer you those. This is why I work with women on the lifestyle aspect because the medical aspect has its limits. Be sure to check out the links for the other episodes regarding stress management so that you can also include a more practical approach for your PCOS health. Then additionally, I want to emphasize that cortisol as a factor here that we’re talking about in this episode, it is not just from feeling stressed. When we think about stress, we can think about getting in a car accident, having a family member that’s sick, or some family situation that has changed, something that’s dramatic and dramatic and big and stressful but the truth is that cortisol can be released by just being overly busy, not getting enough sleep, and feeling rushed or things that you may feel like you have completely handled. We talk about that in some of the other episodes regarding stress and cortisol but I do want to point out that cortisol and stress and your perceived notion of how stressed you are, aren’t always clear indicators of how much cortisol you’re pumping into your body. It could just be that you’re staying up too late, getting up too early, traveling, circadian rhythm, could be dieting too hard is causing your body stress. Anything that your body perceives as stressful, as scary, as non-conducive to it being able to do its job easily, it’s going to count as stress, and it’s going to have a hyper cortisol tendency in your body. So It may not release as much in some regards of that perceived stress as in others, but there’s definitely a disconnect between sometimes how we feel stress and how our body perceives stress. I do want to point that out.

I would love to hear your takeaways, your follow-up questions, because I know this one’s a very deeply scientific, very difficult to read article, honestly, but I found it so fascinating and I wanted to share it with you. But if you have follow-up questions, you know where to find me. I’m over on Instagram. Send me a DM @Nourishedtohealthy. I’d love to answer all of your follow-up questions over on Instagram. Until next time, bye for now.

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Episode #87: Mia’s IVF Success Through Root Cause Healing and Mindful Nutrition

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Mia's IVF Success Through Root Cause Healing and Mindful Nutrition

What you’ll learn in this episode

After five years of navigating fertility struggles, ovulation tests, and numerous attempts, Mia’s journey to motherhood took an unexpected turn. Join me on the PCOS Repair podcast as I have the honor of sharing Mia’s raw and honest story, exploring the highs, and lows, of her IVF journey.

PCOS and Starting a Family 

At 27, Mia received a PCOS diagnosis, setting the stage for a challenging fertility journey. Despite weight loss attempts and medications, initial rounds of Clomid and IUI proved unsuccessful. Mia faced disappointments and emotional turmoil, compounded by the physical toll of fertility treatments as she continued on to IVF.

Mindset and Lifestyle Transformation

Nearly a decade later, at 36, Mia felt the urgency to start a family. This time, she sought a holistic approach, combining IVF with a focus on health and vitality. Her mindset shift from feeling helpless to actively participating in her fertility journey became a powerful tool for success.

Mia’s mindset transformation played a crucial role as she embraced a proactive and positive approach. Her commitment to optimizing nutrition, movement, and self-care became integral to preparing her body for IVF.

Embracing The Unexpected 

After several rounds, it wasn’t until the fourth IVF attempt that Mia received the call she had been eagerly awaiting. The news was positive – she was pregnant. A whirlwind of emotions accompanied the revelation, especially when she learned some additional unexpected news. 

Mia’s story shares so much hope and inspiration for navigating PCOS and fertility challenges. And don’t forget to share your takeaways and connect with me on Instagram @Nourishedtohealthy.

Let’s Continue The Conversation

Do you have questions about this episode or other questions about PCOS? I would love to connect and chat on a more personal level over on Instagram. My DMs are my favorite place to chat more.

 

So go visit me on IG @nourishedtohealthy.com

 

Let’s Continue The Conversation

Do you have questions about this episode or other questions about PCOS? I would love to connect and chat on a more personal level over on Instagram. My DMs are my favorite place to chat more.

 

So go visit me on IG @nourishedtohealthy.com

 

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Read The Full Episode Transcript Here

After five years of trying and more ovulation tests, supplements, books, weight loss attempts, and yoga than she could count, Mia and her husband were still unsuccessful in their attempts to start a family. She kept thinking to herself, I’m not getting any younger. She decided that if she wasn’t pregnant by her 36th birthday, then she was going to take the next step. But when that day came and she still wasn’t pregnant, she sent me a message and booked her first consultation. At the same time, she also started working with her fertility specialist again to restart IVF. As scared as she was to try again, she was more afraid of living with the regret of not trying again and reaching a point in her life where this opportunity had passed. In today’s episode, it is It’s my honor to share a very real and honest story that just gives me chills and touches me in ways that I am happy and emotional all at the same time when I talk to Mia and I am excited to share the story with you today, and I greatly appreciate her being willing to allow me to share it. So without further ado, let’s get started.

You’re listening to the PCOS Repair podcast, where we explore the ins and outs of PCOS and how to repair the imbalances in your hormones naturally with a little medical help sprinkled in. Hi, I’m Ashlene Korcek, and with many years of medical and personal experience with polycystic ovarian syndrome, it is my joy to watch women reverse their PCOS as they learn to nourish their body in a whole new way. With the power of our beliefs, our mindset, and our environment, and the understanding of our genetics, we can heal at the root cause.

Welcome back to the PCOS Repair podcast, where today it is my joy and honor to share a very raw and real story with you about Mia and her IVF journey to becoming a mom. I love sharing stories here on the PCOS Repair podcast that some of my previous clients have allowed me to share. These are women that I have worked with over the last couple of years, and so they are well into their PCOS healing stories. I think that being able to see where someone was and where someone was able to get on their journey is so inspiring and provides so much hope that I hope you find these episodes extra special, especially since they are a gift from the women that are willing to let me share them. With that, I want to start back with how how Mia got started on her journey with PCOS health and how this courageous woman who faced the challenges of PCOS and infertility for over a decade until she finally got her double miracle was able to work with her mindset, her emotions, her fears, and her physical health to bring this about with the assistance of modern medicine.

Mia was diagnosed back when she was 27 years with PCOS. This occurred when her husband and her were starting to try for a family. After stopping birth control, she had gone about seven months without really regaining any sign of a period, and definitely no sign of ovulation. She made an appointment with her OB/GYN. She went through all the normal run-around of tests and labs being abnormal and okay. Ultimately, her diagnosis was PCOS, and her OB/GYN Then prescribed her some metformin to take for 3-6 months with the goal of losing about 20 pounds, and then stating that if ovulation didn’t restart on its own and she wasn’t able to get pregnant naturally, to follow up, and they would consider starting some Clomid. Six months later, Mia still hadn’t recovered her period. Although she had lost close to 15 pounds, she felt really discouraged. She felt less healthy, she felt like she was just miserable on this 1,000-calorie-a-day diet that she had put herself on in order to lose that 15 pounds at such a calorie deficit, she had still only lost 15 pounds and hit a wall and couldn’t lose anymore but if she ate any more than that 1,000 calories a day, she would start to gain weight.

She felt a little frustrated with that, but also felt like if that weight needed to be off in order for her to have a baby, that was the primary goal. She would hang in for a little longer. When she went back to her doctor for her follow-up, because she still wasn’t having a period, her doctor started her on Clomid and an induction period, so probably something like progestin to induce a period. She was filled with all sorts of mixed emotions, but grateful that at least there was the option of medications. Although she felt disheartened by the fact that she had lost the 15 pounds, had taken the metformin, although it was not a pleasant experience for her, she had a lot of GI upset with the metformin, she felt like it was discouraging that none of that had worked, but was hopeful that Clomid would. Moving through her experience with Clomid, she took six months, so basically six rounds of Clomid without that being successful, they moved on to IUI, and then she underwent two unsuccessful rounds of IUI. At the time, her insurance did allow her at that point to move on to IVF, and so that was her next step.

[00:06:12.000] – Speaker 1
This was a big step for her emotionally. She felt like there had been so many things that hadn’t worked she felt like her insurance was a blessing in order to be able to have this as an option, but she felt like she was nearing the end of options, and so this felt like there was a lot of pressure on this option. She felt the pressure, but she also felt very overwhelmed as medications and instructions started to pile up. She remembers just having to almost go into an altered state of an out-of-body experience and just take it one step at a time. She recalls that she felt as if she was living her life in two week increments and nothing else in her life mattered. Everything was based around what the two weeks that she was going to be doing, and everything was focused around this. The day before her 29th birthday, she had her egg retrieval and found out how many eggs that they had gotten. She was at this point, so invested in the process that when she got the news, she cried because she had only gotten seven eggs. She felt like this was such a process that she had gone through, that she had been really hopeful for more.

Then she just kept repeating to herself, again, in this altered out-of-body experience that it just takes one, it just takes one, it just takes one. She started to another period of waiting as she waited to see how many of these eggs would take in the fertilization process. The first round of IVF yield two embryos, and they decided to do a fresh transfer, which did not succeed. She was extremely devastated by this because now she only had one embryo left. She remembers feeling like that, of course, they would try the second embryo, but at that point, she did not feel hopeful at all. With only one embryo left and her feeling very disheartened and unhopeful, she remembers not even feeling surprised when she got the news that the second was unsuccessful as well. By this point, her husband and her had had some job changes and some insurance changes. The new insurance was not going to continue to cover IVF. Between that and the fact that she just felt disheartened by all of it. She felt like none of it was working, and she felt like it was taking over her entire life. She was ready for a break.

Her husband was definitely ready for a break. They decided to take some time off and see what would happen naturally on its own and hoping that taking a break would lead to a natural miracle. Mia remembers distinctly that although she felt really devastated at having gone through all of the appointments, the medications, the side effects, the highs and lows. Over a year of infertility treatment, she was so relieved to have a break from it and to not have this disappointment just looming over her at all times because she felt like every single bit of this journey was just led with, Well, that didn’t work, that didn’t work, that didn’t work. That was how she felt the whole way through. It wasn’t like, Oh, we have this hopeful thing that’s going to happen. It was just like, fail, fail, fail. That’s how she saw this series of fertility treatments in her late 20s. She also recalls that during this period, while she had maintained that 15-pound weight loss, that she had never felt less healthy in her entire life. As she brought this chapter of fertility treatments to a close, she was hopeful of being able to focus on her health in a way where she could feel good in her body again.

So nearly a decade from when Mia had first been diagnosed with PCOS, she began to feel the urgency to try again. She was 36 years old, and since having her fertility treatment, she felt like she had never gotten her health back on track. She had gained the 15 pounds back and more. This time, she was determined to not just restart the attempts of wanting to start a family. But this time, she also wanted to feel healthy. She wanted to have a positive experience of how she felt throughout the process, both physically and mentally. She felt like While she did everything, quote, right last time, she wasn’t showing up in a way that she felt like her body was working with the medical treatment to achieve a successful result. She wanted to be a mom, and she also really had an image in her mind of how she wanted to feel and the health that she wanted to achieve in that process of becoming a mom before diving into another round of IVF. Since everything had previously Obviously been unsuccessful and because of her age, she felt like she did not want to wait to continue medical intervention towards starting a family.

When she messaged me, her primary concern that she brought to my attention was, I want to feel healthy. I need help feeling healthy again in my body. While she didn’t want to wait to start fertility treatments, she also could recognize that health and vitality were the missing piece in the previous rounds. While While she felt the pressure of time, she also felt the pressure of needing to focus on her health. Mia and her husband started their IVF process again, but this time she also started to work with her PCOS root causes, the waiting in the roller coasters, the highs and lows, and the constant anxiety that she had felt last time, this time, she took that energy and she focused it into her health. While all of those things were still happening. This is the part that watching her make this transition for herself and watching her have all of the fears and the doubts of the emotional roller coaster and the anxieties and the highs and the lows coming for her like they do for all of us. Watching her choose her mindset so deliberately and decidedly to remain positive and curious and hopeful and experimental and focusing on what she can do and not focusing on the things that were outside of her control, but being curious and anticipatory and not putting this pressure of this time has to be the one that works.

Having been through it before, she said that it was less scary, it was less foreign. She was able to, in that sense, have some feel feeling of knowing what’s coming and able to be a little bit more free with that. But choosing her mindset was an incredible, powerful way that she was able to focus on optimizing her nutrition and her movement and her mindset and self-care instead of allowing herself to get sucked into living by the two-week increments. Of course, she followed all the protocols. She did all the things she was supposed to do for her fertility treatment. The way that we worked with it together is I want to do my part of preparing my body to show up at its best, mentally and physically. As we worked together, I would assist her in what would help her body show up physically and mentally in a way that worked with her hormones to help her body be as best prepared for the medical intervention of IVF as possible. Mia’s mindset transformation from this helpless, just going through the motions to this crazy, incredible, inspiring empowerment, she began to view food as this source of healing for her fertility.

She hadn’t always been the most adventurous Eater, but she remembers feeling like it had less to do with what are her favorite foods, but more about this curiosity about how could she fit in different nutrients into her day because she knew that they were going to be ideal for what her body needed at this point in time. Rather than fighting what she felt like she needed to eat, it was this game to her of like, Well, how can I get these foods in a way that I can tolerate into my diet? She recounts how completely different she felt having this very active role. She said that it made her feel so much more engaged, like she was part of the team instead of sitting back, overthinking and just being hit with bad news after bad news. Bad news still came sometimes. But instead, because she was an active player, she felt like as bad news came, it was on her to also make adjustments. And so she didn’t feel like this helpless victim that was just being taken along this ride of bad news. Instead, she was an active player that was able to adjust and change and also impact react the outcome.

She remembers that this time around, she felt like she had this incredible energy and was no longer, because as we started to work together, we got rid of that too-low-calorie diet. She no longer was energy deficient, and she felt like she was finally actually able to nourish her body and feel great doing it and having enough calories to actually feel good along the process. She was not met, like I mentioned, she was not met with immediate success. It wasn’t until the fourth round that she finally got the phone call that she had been waiting for. She remembers the phone ringing, and she had been waiting for the call. And although she was doing a very good job of keeping a positive mindset, she remembers the phone ringing and her stomach just dropping. All of a sudden, she was just convinced it was going to be more bad news. But this time it wasn’t. She was telling me how she’s like, I’ll never forget sitting there hearing the news and realizing that this time was successful and being offered an appointment to come in to have an ultrasound and not even being able to fully comprehend what all was being said.

But she remembers smiling all day long. She’s like, It didn’t matter what someone was telling me. It didn’t matter what was going on at work. She’s like, I could not get that smile off of my face. When her husband and her went in for their first pregnancy ultrasound, she remembers, again, having just these butterflies in her stomach feeling like something wasn’t going to be quite right. When the doctor was really quiet looking at the screen, she remembers just waiting for more bad news. But when the doctor turned around and started pointing to the screen, he said, Do you see that? She remembers squinting and looking at it, and he’s like, That is your embryo, and it has split. You are pregnant with twins. She was just like… She said that if she wasn’t sitting so firmly on the table, she would have just collapsed to the floor. She all of a sudden had this just overwhelming, it had been so long that they had wanted to start a family She had gone through so many emotional roller coasters of thinking of the timing of how would they have more than one children. She didn’t like the idea of raising an only child.

She wanted to have many children, and yet time was ticking, and all of a sudden, she was having twins. Then at the same time, she knew that the risk of twins was definitely higher. She just started to all of a sudden have all of this excitement, but all of these fears. She remembers thinking later that I thought this was the point at which I got to be happy, and now all of a sudden, I barely had a moment to even be happy before I start to worry again. Thank goodness for the tools that I had learned to have the mindset to be able to to cope with continued stress along a high-risk pregnancy. She did, later on in her pregnancy, at 33 weeks, have some issues with preeclampsia and eventually had to deliver early. Her twin girls were premature at 34 weeks, so they did spend a little bit of time in the NICU, but luckily, she was able to carry them as long as she was. Thirty-four weeks has a very good outcome probability compared to in the the late 20 weeks or even earlier 30 weeks. She did take the time to meet with me in preparation for recording this episode today.

But twin life has definitely been very busy and overwhelming at times. But, and this will make me choke up to, she was saying how every time that she starts to get overwhelmed with having two small, very busy, very energetic powerhouse daughters in her home, and she starts to feel overwhelmed and too busy and pulled in too many directions when she takes a moment to take a step back and to realize how much went into those two little miracles, the emotions are still very overwhelming to her, and she still very frequently is overrun with being choked up, just like I am now. I know looking at my own children and realizing when you have struggled, when you have put this in there, and when you have overcome, and you have been able to achieve something that You didn’t know what it would look like yet. She didn’t know it would look like twins. We don’t know what that future holds for us, but we show up every day and we work on our root causes, on our health, on our healing, both physically and also extremely importantly, mentally and emotionally. We don’t know where it will take us.

When it takes us there, the person that we become through that process is also a very incredible journey. With that, I always like to invite you to reach out to me at my Instagram DMs. When we’re sharing stories of women that have been willing to share their stories here as a reminder that you’re not alone, as a reminder that there are so many ways that we can impact our health and create what we want to create in our lives. I love to share your takeaways with them. If you have any ahas, inspirations, things that touched you, moved you, and that you’ll be taking away from these stories that we share here, I would love to share your takeaways with Mia. If you have any things that you would like me to share with her, I would love to hear them in my DMs. Of course, if you have any questions about PCOS, that’s also a great place to reach me over on Instagram @Nourishedtohealthy. Until next time, bye for now.

Take The PCOS Root Cause Quiz

   What Do Your Symptoms Mean?

  Discover your current PCOS Root Cause

Start to reverse PCOS at the root cause. 

Results are not guaranteed. Please see Medical Disclaimer for more detail.

Similar Podcasts You Will Enjoy

Episode #90: The Hormone Domino Effect: Tracing Imbalances to Symptoms in PCOS

Episode #90: The Hormone Domino Effect: Tracing Imbalances to Symptoms in PCOS

Explore the intricate journey of PCOS symptoms as they traverse the hormonal hierarchy pyramid. Discover the domino effect of hormonal imbalances, genetic predispositions, and lifestyle factors. Delve into how these interconnected elements contribute to the manifestation and progression of PCOS symptoms, offering insight into personalized management approaches.

Episode #89: Building Resilience in the Face of PCOS Challenges

Episode #89: Building Resilience in the Face of PCOS Challenges

Resilience in PCOS is crucial for overcoming challenges like irregular periods and emotional strains. Through self-awareness, self-care, and support, we empower ourselves to adapt and thrive. It’s a journey of self-compassion, problem-solving, and adaptability, requiring patience and ongoing effort. Embracing this process enables us to create lasting PCOS health and well-being.

About Show

Welcome to The PCOS Repair Podcast!

I’m Ashlene Korcek, and each week I’ll be sharing the latest findings on PCOS and how to make practical health changes to your lifestyle to repair your PCOS at the root cause.

If you’re struggling with PCOS, know that you’re not alone. In fact, it’s estimated that one in ten women have PCOS. But the good news is that there is a lot we can do to manage our symptoms and live healthy, happy lives.

So whether you’re looking for tips on nutrition, exercise, supplements, or mental health, you’ll find it all here on The PCOS Repair Podcast. Ready to get started? Hit subscribe now

Episode #86: PCOS and Polycystic Ovaries: Exploring the Connection

Episode #86: PCOS and Polycystic Ovaries: Exploring the Connection

Episode #86: PCOS and Polycystic Ovaries: Exploring the Connection

This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my disclosure and privacy policy.

PCOS and Polycystic Ovaries: Exploring the Connection

What you’ll learn in this episode

Historically PCOS symptoms like infertility, facial hair, and weight issues were intertwined with small cystic structures on the ovaries. In this episode, you will understand the origin of the term “polycystic ovaries” and what impact they have on fertility and symptoms. Let’s explore how hormonal imbalances shape the narrative, leading to the association between these cystic structures and PCOS symptoms.

Cysts and PCOS

Contrary to common belief, the cystic-like lesions of PCOS are not true cysts but rather clusters of follicles that fail to fully mature. We explore the delicate hormonal dance of FSH (follicular stimulating hormone) and LH (luteinizing hormone) ratios, shedding light on the science behind the polycystic ovarian appearance. Learn to distinguish between polycystic ovaries and isolated single cysts that might cause discomfort, understanding that the latter is unrelated to PCOS.

Diagnosing PCOS: A Deeper Look:

The diagnostic criteria for PCOS require two out of three factors: elevated androgens, polycystic ovaries, and irregular periods. Let’s talk about the significance of symptoms, and what if lab values fall within the normal range. The presence of root cause symptoms is a pivotal step for understanding your path to PCOS health. Gain insights into how doctors can assist you during the diagnostic process while realizing the limitations of conventional medical approaches in addressing the broader lifestyle and root causes of PCOS.

By taking a proactive stance in your PCOS journey and embracing lifestyle adjustments, nutritional choices, and mindset habits that extend beyond conventional medical practices you can finally feel your body working with you instead of against you. By hitting play and tuning into this episode you will gain a better understanding of a holistic approach, the significance of ultrasound examinations, and so much more.

Let’s Continue The Conversation

Do you have questions about this episode or other questions about PCOS? I would love to connect and chat on a more personal level over on Instagram. My DMs are my favorite place to chat more.

 

So go visit me on IG @nourishedtohealthy.com

 

Let’s Continue The Conversation

Do you have questions about this episode or other questions about PCOS? I would love to connect and chat on a more personal level over on Instagram. My DMs are my favorite place to chat more.

 

So go visit me on IG @nourishedtohealthy.com

 

rate the podcast

Spread the Awareness

If you have found this podcast helpful please take just a moment to rate it and leave a review. This helps apple, spotify or whichever platform you use know to share this podcast with other women. I truely appreciate your help supporting as many women as possible

Read The Full Episode Transcript Here

Back in the history of PCOS, the symptoms of not being able to get pregnant, facial hair, and being overweight were linked to women that had these small cystic-like structures on their ovaries. We pointed the term polycystic ovaries, but we didn’t know a whole lot about the disease, we didn’t know a whole lot about what was causing it and so at the time, it was named that because we thought that these polycystic ovaries were linked to why we were having these other symptoms, why we weren’t able to get pregnant and all these other findings that we had. But now, if you think about the way our hormones work, what’s really happening to create polycystic ovaries, or ovaries with multiple little pseudocysts, they’re not real cysts, they’re these little cyst-like-looking structures, is because we are trying to mature a follicle, but we’re not able to fully mature it to the point of ovulation where the follicle is matured to an egg and releases such during ovulatory event. Really, polycystic ovaries are just another finding or a symptom of having our hormones out of balance. That’s why in today’s episode, we are going to be looking at lots of details about why ovaries get cysts and the different kinds of cysts and all the different causes. So let’s dive in.

You’re listening to the PCOS Repair podcast, where we explore the ins and outs of PCOS and how to repair the imbalances in your hormones naturally with a little medical help sprinkled in. Hi, I’m Ashlene Korcek, and with many years of medical and personal experience with polycystic ovarian syndrome. It is my joy to watch women reverse their PCOS as they learn to nourish their body in a whole new way. With the power of our beliefs, our mindset, and our environment, and the understanding of our genetics, we can heal at the root cause.

Welcome back to the PCOS Repair podcast, where today we’re going to be talking about PCOS and cysts on the ovaries. This is a very, very, very often confused topic when it comes to PCOS. I want to help you understand better what we’re dealing with, why this is happening, and what actually is related to PCOS and what is not related to PCOS. So that you have a better understanding of what’s going on with your body. If you go and you see your doctor and they tell you various things, you know why. Sometimes you may have polycystic ovaries, why sometimes you may not have polycystic ovaries, and so forth. The criteria for PCOS is that you need to have two of the following three. You either need to have elevated androgens, so that could be either on laboratory values or symptoms of. I think that’s really important to remember is that the symptoms are enough. You don’t have to have abnormal labs because if you’re having symptoms of elevated androgens or imbalanced androgens, chances are they’re abnormal for you, even if they fall in the normal range for the majority because a small difference in our laboratory values can still make a huge difference in our symptoms.

Even a small fluctuation inside of the normal range for laboratory values can affect how we actually show up with our PCOS and what symptoms we are or are not having. That’s important to remember, symptoms should lab work, they don’t always… Doctors will listen to your symptoms and then they’ll be like, Let’s check your labs. Oh, your labs came back normal, therefore, must not be relevant. That’s not a good way to look at PCOS. If the symptoms are there, we should We shouldn’t really treat the symptoms, not necessarily with medication, not necessarily with birth control, but we should take a lifestyle adjustment approach to discovering why are you having those symptoms. That’s looking at the root cause and then looking at what does your body need in order to feel better, to alleviate those symptoms that are bothering you, and so forth. Okay, so back to the criteria. Science of elevated androgens, polycystic ovaries, irregular periods. Two of those three are required to be diagnosed with PCOS. In that sense, what is this whole polycystic ovary thing? What does that even mean? Some people will be like, Well, I’ve had cyst on my ovaries. They’ve ruptured, they’ve caused pain.

That’s a different cyst. Now, painful periods, all of those things are usually separate from PCOS. They can go hand in hand very commonly. Certain hormones being elevated, if you’re estrogen dominant, you can have some more painful periods because you may have heavier periods. But for the most part, painful periods is not specific to PCOS. Cysts that rupture, single large cysts that rupture, are not PCOS. That’s a huge myth that people think, Oh, I had a cyst in my ovaries, I must have PCOS. A cyst that ruptures a large single, solitary cyst is like getting a cyst anywhere else on the body. A true cyst is something that you’re going to have a single. Sometimes it’s painful, It can fluctuate, sometimes someone will have a cyst in their breast tissue or under their skin. Those are things where it’s one cyst. It’s usually tender. It’s something that needs to be removed. It’s actually a little sac that has almost what looks like a pimples bowl inside of it, that type of a fluid, almost white, ricotta cheese-looking stuff. Some people think they’re nasty, but I worked in dermatology for a long time, so we saw lots of cystic tissue.

That’s a true cyst. That has nothing to do with polycystic ovaries. What we’re talking about with polycystic is many cyst-like structures, and they’re not true cyst, they’re cyst-like structures on the ovaries. You have more of these clusters of grapes or many little tiny nodules on the creating this polycystic ovarian appearance. Why does that happen? I alluded to it earlier, but the point here is that it happens because your FSH levels do not go high enough to fully mature a follicle. During the first part of your cycle, so you have your period, and then your first part of your cycle is your follicular phase, your FSH, your follicular stimulating hormone, is on the rise, telling your ovary to select a follicle and begin maturing it into an egg for ovulation. Now, if this happens month over month over month where you don’t fully mature an egg, you start to have many partially matured follicles. You have all these, you could say, teenage follicles hanging out on your ovaries, creating this polycystic ovarian appearance. That is where that comes in. But really, truly, that’s just a FSH-LH ratio problem, which comes down to an elevated androgen because having high levels of testosterone tends to throw off this LH, FSH ratio.

Again, having polycystic ovaries really just points to an androgen imbalance than it does anything else. True cysts, on the other hand, you could get one with PCOS, but they would not be related. It’s just like you could have other non-related issues. You can get an ingrown toenail with polycystic ovarian syndrome and it has nothing to do with it. Going back to the practical, why does any of this even matter? Number one, we want to feel good in our bodies. We’re having symptoms of PCOS that we are not enjoying, and we want to know why so that we can figure out what we need to do to feel better. Correct? At least that’s how I’ve always approached PCOS. Now, we want our bodies to work with us. We don’t want them working against us. We also want to have an understanding of what would work because one of the most frustrating things when it comes to PCOS is that we feel like nothing works. We feel like all of the information must work for somebody, but it doesn’t work for me. Being able to finally understand what it is that your body is needing, and then you get to choose to the degree at which you want to put that effort in to do it to the degree that you want your body to feel better.

Usually, This is something where we find that balance, we find that sweet spot, we find what works for us in the lifestyle approach of our body working the way we want and achieving the goals that matter to us. I think it’s important with this conversation today because I’ve been getting a lot of a lot of DMs about, I have an appointment to see my doctor. What do I need to ask my doctor for help with? I think it’s really important to point out here that the diagnosis criteria does not help us to determine what is going on in the root cause of our hormones. It helps us to determine whether or not we are dealing with something other than PCOS. This is actually a backwards thing. When it comes to the diagnosis of PCOS, really what clinicians are looking at is something else going wrong. They’re not really looking to see, do you have PCOS? They’re making sure that you don’t have a thyroid disorder. They’re making sure that you don’t have some other issue going on that needs to be dealt with more acutely or needs to be taken care of. If you have type 2 diabetes, it may be showing up as PCOS symptoms, and that type 2 diabetes needs to be taken care of.

That’s really where your clinician is the most concerned. They don’t have a lot to offer you for PCOS. At the end of the day, they give you the diagnosis because it’s like, Well, this is what you probably are dealing with, and that’s the end of the road of what we need to look into. When it comes to your doctor, they have very limited resources to help you beyond diagnosing PCOS, continued monitoring to make sure the risk factors aren’t showing up, and to potentially offer you some birth control to help override the hormone imbalance. It’s a bandaid. It can cause more problems for some women than it helps. Tread lightly with that one. Look into the options there. We’ve talked about it on other episodes, so I’m not going to go into it in great detail here. The other thing they can offer you is something like Metformin. Then, of course, if you want assistance with fertility, they can assist you there. That’s where your doctor can help you. They do not get into why are you having these symptoms from a root cause standpoint. These have to do more with your metabolic health and the overall nurturing environment that you’re providing your body of if it’s working or if it’s not working.

Those are really where we get into with the root causes, but that has a lot more to do with life lifestyle adjustments, nutrition, movement habits, mindset habits, and things that doctors just don’t really get into. They weren’t trained about it in medical school. They were trained to treat acute problems. They weren’t trained very much in preventative health. Now, they’re beginning to be trained maybe a little bit more in preventative health. Hopefully, they keep talking about it a little bit more. But when you think about all of the different topics that they have to learn about and all of the different diseases that they would have to learn preventative health about, it’s still very minimal And so when it comes to PCOS, your doctor is a very important part of your healthcare team, but they’re not going to be able to give you a great deal of assistance when it comes to the lifestyle adjustments in the root causes of your PCOS health. They can help you monitor they can help you with some medications if that’s the route you want to take, and that’s about it. So this is where in conclusion today, recapping, I think that it’s interesting whether or not you have polycystic ovaries.

I think that’s something that can be An interesting fact about as interesting and probably a little less annoying than finding that you have hairs on your chin. So it really amounts to about the same thing. What is more important in your ultrasound, and so what you really want to pay more attention to, and hopefully your doctor is evaluating during an ultrasound, is sure it’s great that they looked at the ovaries and commented on whether or not they had this polycystic appearance or not. But what you want to see is, do they see any concerns with the anatomy as far as fallopian tubes and making sure everything is there and making sure everything appears to be as expected. Now, sometimes there’s a limit to what we can see on ultrasound, but they want to get at least a first scan to make sure everything looks anatomically correct and so there shouldn’t be anything blaring that they see that would be a cause for concern in the ability to get pregnant or carry a healthy baby to term. So that would be a good thing for them to be able to look at. But other than that, the ultrasound is just one more way of determining like they would do a physical exam, like they’re looking to see, do you have extra hair on your chin? Do you have a thinning pattern on the top of your head, et cetera?

So I hope that makes the cystic question a little bit more clear. Also, we went a little off topic and talked about what your doctor can help you with and where their area of expertise is in this whole puzzle of PCOS. Any follow-up questions, I welcome those over on Instagram, the best place to reach me, my DMs, because that’s where I tend to spend the most time chatting I welcome your questions there. Until next time, bye for now.

Take The PCOS Root Cause Quiz

   What Do Your Symptoms Mean?

  Discover your current PCOS Root Cause

Start to reverse PCOS at the root cause. 

Results are not guaranteed. Please see Medical Disclaimer for more detail.

Similar Podcasts You Will Enjoy

Episode #90: The Hormone Domino Effect: Tracing Imbalances to Symptoms in PCOS

Episode #90: The Hormone Domino Effect: Tracing Imbalances to Symptoms in PCOS

Explore the intricate journey of PCOS symptoms as they traverse the hormonal hierarchy pyramid. Discover the domino effect of hormonal imbalances, genetic predispositions, and lifestyle factors. Delve into how these interconnected elements contribute to the manifestation and progression of PCOS symptoms, offering insight into personalized management approaches.

Episode #89: Building Resilience in the Face of PCOS Challenges

Episode #89: Building Resilience in the Face of PCOS Challenges

Resilience in PCOS is crucial for overcoming challenges like irregular periods and emotional strains. Through self-awareness, self-care, and support, we empower ourselves to adapt and thrive. It’s a journey of self-compassion, problem-solving, and adaptability, requiring patience and ongoing effort. Embracing this process enables us to create lasting PCOS health and well-being.

About Show

Welcome to The PCOS Repair Podcast!

I’m Ashlene Korcek, and each week I’ll be sharing the latest findings on PCOS and how to make practical health changes to your lifestyle to repair your PCOS at the root cause.

If you’re struggling with PCOS, know that you’re not alone. In fact, it’s estimated that one in ten women have PCOS. But the good news is that there is a lot we can do to manage our symptoms and live healthy, happy lives.

So whether you’re looking for tips on nutrition, exercise, supplements, or mental health, you’ll find it all here on The PCOS Repair Podcast. Ready to get started? Hit subscribe now

Episode #85: The Power of Affirmations in PCOS Healing

Episode #85: The Power of Affirmations in PCOS Healing

Episode #85: The Power of Affirmations in PCOS Healing

This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my disclosure and privacy policy.

The Power of Affirmations in PCOS Healing

What you’ll learn in this episode

Ever wondered how our thoughts influence our healing journey? In this episode of the PCOS Repair podcast, where we unravel the mystery behind the power of affirmations and their magical impact on PCOS health.

The Power of Thoughts

Explore the profound influence our thoughts have on our PCOS health journey. Understand why affirmations are not just empty words but a secret weapon to combat negative thoughts and nurture a mindset that supports holistic well-being.

Personalized Affirmations for Your PCOS

Discover the transformative potential of crafting personalized affirmations. From boosting fertility to becoming a team with your body, learn how specific and meaningful affirmations can bridge the gap between what you know and what you want to believe.

Example Affirmations

Use this list as inspiration to craft your own affirmations:

Certainly! Here are 25 PCOS-related affirmations divided into sections for energy, weight management, and fertility:

Energy:

  1. “I am full of vibrant energy, nourishing my body and spirit.”
  2. “Every cell in my body radiates vitality and strength.”
  3. “I am capable of achieving my goals with boundless energy.”
  4. “My energy levels are increasing every day, bringing joy to my life.”
  5. “I am grateful for the positive energy flowing through me, promoting wellness.”

Weight Management:

  1. “I respect and care for my body, making choices that support my weight goals.”
  2. “My body is a temple, and I nourish it with love and healthy choices.”
  3. “I release the excess weight with ease, embracing my natural, healthy state.”
  4. “I am in control of my eating habits, choosing foods that support my well-being.”
  5. “My body is balanced, and I effortlessly maintain a healthy weight.”

Fertility:

  1. “My body is a fertile ground, ready to nurture and bring forth new life.”
  2. “I trust in my body’s ability to conceive and create a healthy pregnancy.”
  3. “I am aligned with the natural rhythm of my fertility, embracing the journey.”
  4. “Every day, my reproductive system functions at its optimal level.”
  5. “I send love and positivity to my reproductive organs, creating a welcoming space for conception.”

Energy:

  1. “I attract positive and uplifting energy into my life.”
  2. “My body is a source of unlimited energy and vitality.”
  3. “With each breath, I inhale positivity and exhale fatigue.”
  4. “I am surrounded by an abundance of energy that fuels my passions.”
  5. “My energy is a magnet for joy, happiness, and well-being.”

Weight Management:

  1. “I honor my body’s unique shape and size, appreciating its strength.”
  2. “Every step I take brings me closer to my ideal, healthy weight.”
  3. “I release any negative beliefs about my body and embrace my beauty.”
  4. “I am mindful of my body’s needs, finding balance in nourishment.”
  5. “I trust the process of my body’s transformation, allowing it to naturally find its optimal weight.”

Taking Action with Affirmations

Ready to embark on your affirmation journey? Identify specific areas of struggle with PCOS—whether it’s energy, weight management, or fertility. Learn how to start with one or two affirmations, strategically placing them in your daily life, and repeating them regularly for a mindset shift and actionable results.

As you work on your affirmations, let them uplift your thoughts and attitude. Remember, you’ve got this!

Let’s Continue The Conversation

Do you have questions about this episode or other questions about PCOS? I would love to connect and chat on a more personal level over on Instagram. My DMs are my favorite place to chat more.

 

So go visit me on IG @nourishedtohealthy.com

 

Let’s Continue The Conversation

Do you have questions about this episode or other questions about PCOS? I would love to connect and chat on a more personal level over on Instagram. My DMs are my favorite place to chat more.

 

So go visit me on IG @nourishedtohealthy.com

 

rate the podcast

Spread the Awareness

If you have found this podcast helpful please take just a moment to rate it and leave a review. This helps apple, spotify or whichever platform you use know to share this podcast with other women. I truely appreciate your help supporting as many women as possible

Read The Full Episode Transcript Here

Our mindset and our thoughts have such a huge power on our ability to heal and work with our bodies and so in today’s episode, we’re going to take the angle of our thoughts and how they affect a holistic approach to our PCOS health. So let’s dive in.

You’re listening to the PCOS Repair podcast, where we explore the ins and outs of PCOS and how to repair the imbalances in your hormones naturally with a little medical help sprinkled in. Hi, I’m Ashlene Korcek, and with many years of medical and personal experience with polycystic ovarian syndrome, it is my joy to watch women reverse their PCOS as they learn to nourish their body in a whole new way. With the power of our beliefs, our mindset, and our environment, and the understanding of our genetics, we can heal at the root cause.

Welcome back to the PCOS Repair podcast, where today we are going to be diving into our thoughts and in particular, affirmations. Affirmations can sound a bit woo-woof to some people, and perhaps they can be used in that way but in this episode, we’re going to be talking about how you can use the power of having a predetermined thought to pull yourself out of the negative thoughts, out of the thoughts that are telling us that we’re stuck, out of the thoughts that are pulling us down and keeping us from being able to reach our potential with our PCOS health and so as you listen to today’s episode, I want you to start by having in mind what are some of the areas that you struggle with. As we get into how to start creating your mindset and your affirmations to support what you’re wanting, first of all, of course, we need to know what it is that we want. Do we want more energy? Do we want easier time managing our weight? Do we want to increase our fertility? Do we want to have more energy? The list goes on and on with PCOS because it can affect so many areas of our life so with that, first of all, the power of thoughts when it comes to our health, when it comes to our entire life and all successes that we want to have, but in particular when it comes to our health, is so incredibly important. Stop and think about it for a second. We’ve all had days where we are down in the dumps and on those days, how much motivation do we have? How much determination to go ahead and do the thing that we wanted to do? At the time of this recording, I’m in January, which is a month where we typically have all of these resolutions, all of these goals that we set for ourselves and as we try to continue those past January into February, and hopefully throughout our life, it’s so easy to say, Oh, I lost motivation or life got busy. What happens there? What’s actually going on? Oftentimes, we have thoughts that were the beginning, the seed of our downfall. If we think about our day and if we’re super busy, we might start telling ourselves, I don’t have time, we might start telling ourselves things like, It’s not working anyway, I don’t even know what to do, I feel like my PCOS is a mystery. All of these things that we tell ourselves give us the excuse to not try, to not take the actions. Then overall, we prove that theory that it was too hard, that we didn’t know how, that we couldn’t do it.

It all starts with our thoughts but how do we get a hold of those thoughts? Our mind wanders, our mind just comes up with things on our own, and we have to learn how to redirect it. One of the best ways to redirect it is to have some predetermined thoughts that we tell ourselves over and over and over. This is where we have sat and we have logically thought through. We have figured out what we what we really do think and what we really do believe and so that when we have those doubts, when our mind starts to be negative, when we are tired, when life gets busy, when we feel discouraged, all of those things are normal but when we have predetermined thoughts, many people call them affirmations. We can help our bodies, help our minds, help ourselves stay focused on how we want to think, how we want to show up in our life and you can do this in all areas, but today we’re going to be talking about it in terms of PCOS.

These aren’t just mantras or empty words or something that you can Google and take somebody else’s. Now, you can get ideas by googling. If you go to today’s show notes on the website, you’ll see I have a whole list of ones that you can get started with to help inspire you but ultimately, you have to make your affirmations your own. For someone who is trying to, say, get pregnant, you may have an affirmation of, I am nurturing and nourishing my body so that my ovaries feel healthy, so that they feel cared for, and so that they are ready to work with me and ovulate monthly. Do you see how specific that was? Just saying, I am nourishing my fertility, that’s a good start but getting really specific into mentally picturing what you’re doing, why you’re doing it, is really helpful for when you’re choosing your food and you have this in the back of your mind of why you’re doing what you’re doing. Also, telling yourself if you have doubts. That’s one where if you realize, Okay, I know what I need to do, I’m just having a hard time staying with it because of whatever reasons but if you actually have doubts that you know what to do or doubts that this will work for you, then make an affirmation on that. My body and I are a team, we work together to create health. Again, you have to take it and make it your own, but that gives you a different angle on how you could take that.

As you create your affirmations, the number one important thing is to think, where are you struggling and where do you want to be? The affirmation is a mindset to bridge that gap. It’s a thing that you already know or that you want to believe, but maybe you have heard it before and you think it’s probably true, but you’re having a hard time actually taking it in and believing it and so saying it over and over and over to yourself can help us to get to that place where, yes, that’s right and as we start to do that and we start to take the actions on it, we start to see that, you know what? This thing that I keep reminding myself is true.

So it’s if you think about a person or a friend in your life, if you constantly remind them, Hey, you matter to me. Of course, I want to hear that. You matter to me. Hey, why didn’t you tell me about your day yesterday? Why didn’t you call me when that happened? I want to hear what’s going on in your life because you matter to me. When we repeatedly tell someone who may not believe that it’s true, and we take the time to act upon it because empty words are just empty words but as we take the time to act upon it, all of a sudden, we start to believe it or they start to believe it in that situation. As you create your affirmation, start with one or two if you’re new to this. If you’ve done this before, you can have many, but you want to start with one or two that you’re focusing on, and then you want to use them consistently. You want to write it down, you can put it on your phone, you want to put it somewhere maybe you have a timer that goes off, and every couple of hours, you remind yourself to go look at it, maybe it’s somewhere that you go frequently, maybe you put it on the refrigerator. Everyone’s going to have a different idea on how to do this because some people, they work from home and they don’t mind having a sticky on their computer, so they see it all day long. You want to have it in a place where you see it, but you also want to have a place where you are comfortable and you don’t feel like it’s maybe too personal and too public. So you have to balance that. Also, I think that you want to look at it with intention and so if you put it somewhere where you just pass by it, so I I actually don’t love having it on my computer unless I only use my computer sporadically throughout the day because in some ways you almost want to have it be a reminder. You could put it in your phone as a calendar appointment and then have it right there that when it pops up as a reminder, on your phone, it’s written right there and you see it intentionally. Take a moment, pause, take it in, say it to yourself, and you either out loud if you’re by yourself or somewhere where you feel comfortable or repeat it in your head quietly and that way, you show up and digest that on a routine basis and not just get used to having it there like you would a decoration or something that you just glance past and don’t see anymore. So that’s what you want to avoid but ultimately, you want to just make sure that you’re it over and over and over and this is your affirmation. You can change it, you can alter it, you can change how many times a day you see it, if there’s days that you feel like you need to see it more, if you start to feel like that negativity is coming in, have it somewhere where you can just read it, hold on to it, you’re going to have it memorized very quickly, and you can even just recite it without having seen it when those negative or doubting thoughts come into your mind.

As we start to use our mindset this way, as we start to program our thoughts to the thoughts that we want to be thinking. We know, how does this work and what should our expectations be? Because sometimes it’s like, Oh, great. I’m doing affirmations. Well, it didn’t seem to do anything for me. In and of themselves, our thoughts don’t do anything for us. We have to back them up with actions but if we don’t first have the thought, the intention, the motivation, the determination, the discipline, and the reminders of the next step for as in we’re continue plodding along, the tortoise wins the race, kind of a thing. If we don’t take the actions, the affirmations still help our mindset, and our mindset is still vastly important. But as we have that mindset, as we take our thoughts and use them to help us move forward in the direction that we want to go with our PCOS health, then we have to also take the actions. If you’re in a place where you’re I actually don’t know what to do, that’s when we seek help. Our affirmations are the next step where we are stuck. If we are in a place where we have no idea what’s going on with our PCOS, we have no idea where to start, then an affirmation that says, I’m nourishing my PCOS in a way that will boost my fertility and my body and I work together, that’s a great affirmation. It’s a little bit hard to believe when you don’t have step one, two, three and three in place first.

You may back up and say, You know what? I’m struggling. You may start with that one and then realize, You know what? I’m missing some pieces. So your affirmation may be, I’m asking for the support of an expert, I’m asking for the support of my family, I’m being more open to getting help, wherever it is that you’re feeling stuck, it may be, I’m open to having these conversations with my partner so that we eat healthier. Wherever it is that you’re being stuck, that’s where your affirmations, your mindset, and your daily reminders basically come in.

In closing today, I would love, if you would be so willing, as to share your affirmations with me over on Instagram. I will keep everything private, I will not share anyone’s names, but I think it would be really cool to share these with each other and I can do that in my Instagram stories. Anyone who feels comfortable sharing their affirmations, now no one’s going to know where you’re at in your journey, no one’s going to even know who shared each one. There is no right or wrong affirmation here, but I think that it’s really helpful to see what other people are saying and to feel the community of all of that.

I get so many DMs from all of you and I just love it that I would love to, this week with this episode, be able to share some of your lovely thoughts with our community over on Instagram. If you are willing to do that, you can find me @Nourishedtohealthy on Instagram. Send me a DM of your affirmations. Of course, if you have any questions about PCOS or anything PCOS, but specifically for this week about affirmations or your mindset or the thoughts that you’re thinking and how to get started, that is also a great place to reach me over on Instagram @Nourishedtohealthy. Until next time, start working on your affirmations. Use them daily. Let them lift your thoughts, lift your attitude, and ultimately help you to take the actions that you need to begin to thrive in your body with your health. Until next time. Bye for now.

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About Show

Welcome to The PCOS Repair Podcast!

I’m Ashlene Korcek, and each week I’ll be sharing the latest findings on PCOS and how to make practical health changes to your lifestyle to repair your PCOS at the root cause.

If you’re struggling with PCOS, know that you’re not alone. In fact, it’s estimated that one in ten women have PCOS. But the good news is that there is a lot we can do to manage our symptoms and live healthy, happy lives.

So whether you’re looking for tips on nutrition, exercise, supplements, or mental health, you’ll find it all here on The PCOS Repair Podcast. Ready to get started? Hit subscribe now